slavery

A Season of Eating Manna

“The Israelites ate manna forty years, until they came to a land that was settled; they ate manna until they reached the border of Canaan.” – Exodus 16:35 Many of you today are in a season of eating manna. Allow me to explain: In the Bible, God’s servant Moses leads the children of Israel out of Egyptian slavery, through the wilderness, and to the Promised Land. In this transition, God provides this bread from heaven called manna. It keeps the people alive but isn’t a great meal.  Maybe you’re in this place today, an in-between wilderness where you’re not in slavery anymore, but you’re not in the Promised Land either. You find yourself in-between point A and point B, and you’re wondering, God, I have this dream, this desire that I feel you’ve put in my heart, but I’ve been waiting so long. When will I get there? That in-between

Read More »

Overcoming Injustice

“Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for human masters, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward. It is the Lord Christ you are serving. Anyone who does wrong will be repaid for their wrongs, and there is no favoritism.” – Colossians 3:23-25 Yesterday, we talked about God’s view of injustice and slavery and we looked at how His love for us never wavers, even when we are being mistreated. Today, I want to talk about how this is possible.  Viktor Frankl, an Austrian Jew who was imprisoned in a concentration camp during the Second World War, once wrote about his experience that, “The one thing they can’t take away from me is my ability to choose how I will respond.” This is the same sentiment that Paul asserts when he writes the

Read More »

A Visionless Church

“See to it that no one takes you captive through hollow and deceptive philosophy, which depends on human tradition and the elemental spiritual forces of this world rather than on Christ.” – Colossians 2:8 Yesterday, I told you about my uber-religious elementary school teacher who instilled major fear in me and my fellow classmates. By reinforcing the idea that we should live with constant anxiety about going to hell so that we continually confess our sins, she introduced a toxic theology that was focused exclusively on what you can’t do. Unfortunately, she was not alone in her dogmatic and fear-based beliefs — such thinking has pervaded many sectors of the church for generations. The major problem with this kind of dogma is that it stifles our souls. When we’re constantly fixated on giving things up without having a greater reason, we become joyless and lackluster. If we need proof of

Read More »

Receive your daily eDevotional

Don't miss new updates in your email!